New study finds ARDS patients who smoke and are obese have poorer quality of life | EurekAlert! Science News

A new study of patients who survive the once-nearly fatal Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome (ARDS) finds their subsequent quality of life has more to do with lifestyle factors than how sick they were in the hospital.Critical care researchers from Intermountain Medical Center in Salt Lake City studied 616 patients who were treated for ARDS to determine what factors played the most significant role in their quality of life six months following discharge from the hospital.The researchers found that patient’s acuity, or level of illness, was not a significant marker in their subsequent quality of life. They found that lifestyle factors, specifically obesity and smoking, were associated with a worse quality of life rating.Results of the study are published in the online issue of Thorax, one of the world’s leading respiratory medicine journals.ARDS is a progressive condition that can occur in patients who are critically ill or who have significant trauma injuries.The main complication in ARDS is that fluid leaks into the lungs making breathing difficult or impossible – and making it difficult to get oxygen into the blood. Most people who get ARDS are already in the hospital for trauma or illness, and are unable to breathe on their own without support from a ventilator.With survival rates improving for ARDS patients, understanding and improving their quality of life outcomes is a clinical and research priority, according to the study’s principal investigator Samuel M. Brown, MD, MS, FASE, director of the Center for Humanizing Critical Care at Intermountain Medical Center.

Source: New study finds ARDS patients who smoke and are obese have poorer quality of life | EurekAlert! Science News

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